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November 2017

WEBINAR: The Power of Framing for HR Pros, AKA How Avoid Being A Victim...

I've been fortunate to do a number of webinars through the years.  Most of them have been about things that allow us to raise our game related to the HR services we provide to the companies we work for.

I'm doing a webinar this Thursday, November 30th at 2pm EST  - and THIS ONE IS ALL FOR YOU - NOT FOR YOUR COMPANY.

The official title is "5 Ways HR Pros Can Use “Framing” To Drive Results, Influence and Authority".  The street smart title is "Never Allow People Who Don't Respect You or HR to Use You Again".

We're talking about communications strategies to make sure you take credit for the good work you do as an HR Pro, and never get caught holding the bag of dog do again because you were too nice. Hancock

Full description below - I hope you'll join me, because I'm pretty passionate about this one.

REGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR BY CLICKING HERE!!

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5 Ways HR Pros Can Use “Framing” To Drive Results, Influence and Authority

The best talent – not good talent, not good to great talent, but the BEST – have one thing in common:

The most talented people consistently "frame" their goals, work and outcomes via varied communication strategies.

What is “framing”? And how can you harness its power?

Join Saba and Fistful of Talent Founder Kris Dunn as we answer those questions and more during our November 30th webinar, 5 Ways HR Pros Can Use “Framing” To Drive Results, Influence and Authority.

Gain insights into:

• How A Players use framing to communicate goals, challenges, progress, wins and finished work product.

• The importance of integrating a variety of communication techniques to enhance awareness and visibility – including face-to-face communications, email, reporting and more.

• Mastering different communications styles to influence peers, direct managers and skip-level executives in your organization.

• How effective framing leads to career opportunities and continuous development.

• How to foster the framing competency in managers and employees you serve as an HR pro.

Take control of the narrative. Register today for 5 Ways HR Pros Can Use “Framing” To Drive Results, Influence and Authority.

 

REGISTER FOR THE WEBINAR BY CLICKING HERE!!


Google For Jobs Launches "Job Board of Choice Apply", Throws Job Boards Big Bone...

Tracking the looming giant in the recruiting industry that is Google For Jobs can be a full-time job.  The latest is a biggie - GFJ rolled out 4 pretty important features last week, including auto-loading of salary data, bookmarking and better geographic search.  But one feature dwarfs them all - something called "Job Board of Choice Apply", described here by industry insider Joel Cheesman over at ERE:

"This update is by far the most interesting and unique to Google. Basically, if the job you’re viewing is located on multiple job boards, you can select which one you want to use when applying for a job. So, if you already have a Monster account, and have built a resume there, you can select to apply to that job via your Monster account and not, for example, through CareerBuilder or a site where you don’t have an account.

You can also opt to apply directly through a company’s ATS and bypass job boards entirely. Google doesn’t say how it decides the order, but in the screenshot, the company site comes before the job sites. (Again, it’s worth noting Indeed won’t be an option, as long as it chooses not to participate in Google for Jobs.) It’ll be interesting to see if Google will release data around the percentage of people who choose a company website versus a job site." (Capitalist note - Joel follows these trends better than anyone, so go follow him)

Job Board of Choice Apply is a big feature launch on Google For Jobs for a couple of different reasons in my eyes:

1--If you're a job board it would seem easy to wonder when Google's going to screw you and just remove you from the process.  "Job Board Choice of Apply" doesn't prevent that in the future, but Google is throwing a big bone to participating Job Boards (Indeed is the only major one not included at this point) by encouraging candidates to smoothly apply via their profile of choice on an existing platform.

2--This clutters the direct relationship you're used to with Indeed, where the traffic gets pushed directly to your careers site.  As an employer, that doesn't feel great, but at Google, it's not about you, Mr/Mrs. Employer - it's about the end user, which is the candidate.

3--You'd think as a casual observer that a candidate bypassing some of the employer careers site could save themselves time by going with the streamlined apply via a profile they have set up on a job board included on GFJ.  You might be right, you might be wrong.  I searched for jobs at at HeathSouth, then tested the job board apply to an RN position (I'd be a great nurse) via LinkedIn, only to get bogged down by a customized apply via LinkedIN process which walked me through 10+ screens and asked for analog info like my street address and home phone number.

Capitalist note - Do people still have home phone numbers?  I thought the only thing that matter was your gmail email address these days.

4--Google will eventually look at this cluster#### of bad user experience in applying for jobs (even on those job boards) and decide to take over that process for everyone.  Trust me, they'll be there. You can't be for user experience and then look at what I described on the LinkedIn auto-apply (which is not auto at all) without fixing it.  Unless it's about money, at which time all bets are off.

Screenshot of how the "Job Board Choice of Apply" options appear shown below.  Look at the row of options under the title in row marked "Apply"

"Will Jack Kevorkian please report to the ER? Consult with Mr. Indeed needed."

Google for jobs

 

 


Why Limited Feedback Points Are Crucial in Corporate Coaching...

You're a coach in the corporate world.  That means you know a lot - about a lot of things.  

It also means you've been trusted - whether formally or informally - to share your observations, thoughts and wisdom with others about their performance.  With that comes great responsibility.  I'm assuming you're good at what you do and have what it takes from a Subject Matter Expertise perspective to coach effectively.

So allow me to tell you where you're going to #### it up:

You're going to give your coaching recipient 10 things to think about the next time they perform the subject of your coaching.

Maybe 5 things.  The number is important, but also meaningless once you go above 2-3 items you attempt to coach on in a single session.  Let me explain what's out there in business books and then give you my own experience.

If you read Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers, you'll see the best in any field have 3 things present as they develop into world-class performers:

--They spent the time practicing - the 10,000 hour rule

--They had access to facilities/tools to practice the skill in question

--They had access to a coach/system that could provide immediate feedback

What's most interesting to me these days is the coaching part of that loop.  The older I get and the more coaching I do, the more I'm convinced that coaches have to be very selective in the feedback they give.  As SME's in whatever we do as coaches, it's easy to unload a list of things that a person should do in order to improve they next time they perform a task/service/etc.

You're a common sense person, so when I tell you "don't give the subject of coaching 10 things/points of feedback", you get it.

What if I told you that 3 points of feedback are too many? 

That's harder, right?

In my outside life away from business, I serve as a basketball shooting coach for some good to great players at a variety of ages.  The research Gladwell cited in Outliers certainly hold true for my students - they have to have a desire to put in the hours, they need access to an indoor gym and they need immediate coaching and feedback, which is where someone like me comes in.

In my basketball coaching life, experience rapidly brought me down to a coaching 3 points of feedback - base/feet, hand placement and speed through the zone/finish.  That's all I coach on, because different players have different styles and it's my job to maximize them - not change something that will take them backwards.

But experience as a coach in hoops has taught me something else - while it's OK to have culled my coaching package down to 3 things, when the player is getting reps in, 3 points of feedback is way too many.

What I've learned is that I can go into a coaching session thinking that we need to work on two of the three, but on a rep by rep basis, I can only give feedback on one.

One point of feedback per rep.

If I give feedback on more than one point of my package, it becomes so overwhelming to the recipient - you guessed it - improves on nothing at times during the session.

You're a good coach in the corporate world.  Check yourself before you wreck yourself when it comes to how you give feedback.

Coaching more than one point of feedback in a session?  It's bad for everyone's health.

 


VIDEO: Dealing with Sidetracks In Coaching Conversations...

Featured today - an interview I did with Tim Sackett for Talent Talks (a great series brought to you by Saba Software) on Dealing with Sidetracks in Coaching Conversations...

You know what sidetracks are even if you don't know them by name...  You know you need to coach a direct report on an issue, so you engage, only to get blown back by the employee with all the reasons the current situation (the one you're coaching on) exists.. It's them, it's their tools, hell, it's even you.

Yes, you! Sidetracks are so dynamic your direct reports can use them to throw you under the bus!!

Take a look at the video below (email subscribers may need to click through to see player) for ideas on how to deal with sidetracks.  If you like what you see, make sure to visit Saba Software- and don't forget to like the video or throw us a comment!


COMPETITION IS NOT A DIRTY WORD: You Want Employees Who Want to Stick It to the Other Guy/Gal...

Yesterday I pinged you about the change in corporate values at Uber.  They have always had a Viking culture, and that works when you're trying to conquer new land/metro areas vs. groups that don't want to be conquered.  Hell, that might even be necessary.  

Uber is making the right pivot and is probably two years late.  Once the majority of the conquering is done, the Viking culture doesn't work so well.  

But don't mistake having a positive set of corporate values with the assumption you don't want people to compete hard vs. the competition, and yes, at times each other (teammates).

You want people in your company who want to compete, and at times, stick it to the other guy/gal.  You just need them to do it with the cloak of professionalism.  With that in mind, I give you this picture of Mark Dantonio, who in this picture had just been informed that his team, Michigan State, is a 16-point underdog on the road at Ohio State.  If you can't see the picture below, enable photos or click through to the site for this gem (analysis below the picture):

Dantonio

This picture says everything you need to know about competition in the workplace and why you have to nurture it as a Talent Leader.

Mark Dantonio is a positive leader in the sports world.  He's soft spoken and generally has teams that overachieve.

But look at the face.  For all the professionalism, the look says it all.  Underneath the talking points, the corporate haircut and the conservative Nike attire, MARK DANTONIO WANTS TO ROLL INTO OHIO STATE AND MAKE KIDS WEARING BUCKEYE GEAR CRY. HE WANTS TO HURT URBAN MEYER'S CAREER.  IF HE COULD GET AWAY WITH IT, HE WOULD HAVE HIS TEAM TRASH THEIR HOTEL ROOMS AND KNOCK OFF A COUPLE OF LIQUOR STORES IN COLUMBUS JUST TO GET READY FOR THE GAME.

But Mark Dantonio is too smart to give you more than this look.  This is all you'll get. You'll quickly become bored by listening to him.  He's not going to give you reason to think that he's anything but a fine, upstanding citizen.

Underneath, he's a lot like the Viking version of Uber.  He's rolling into a city that doesn't want him or respect him, and he's just been told he's a huge underdog.  He's got a history of rolling into big games as an underdog and making people pay.

He's a Viking.  But he's a smart Viking. You'll never get him on record with anything that can be used against him.

But the look says it all.  HE'S COMING TO TAKE YOUR MOTHER ####### LIVELIHOOD FOR DISRESPECTING HIM.

This is what you need in your workforce.  You need to see the look every once in awhile from your best people.  You need them on that edge.  

The best ones never show you more than this look.

 


UBER: These Are My Values. There Are Many Like Them, But These Are Mine...

"This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine"

--partial quote from the Rifleman's Creed (USMC), popularized in the movie Full Metal Jacket (click for video)

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It's hard to make sure cultural values stand out as a company.

Sometimes it's better that they just blend in and sound like everyone else's.  That's what's going on at Uber. Uber

It's been two months since Dara Khosrowshahi began his reign as Uber's new CEO, and like most new CEOs, he's on the listening trail, hearing the good, the bad and the ugly. and as the new CEO of Uber, that listening tour is probably more important than it is at most companies...

First on the agenda - rounding off the edges of a hard knock culture.  That's why DK's post on LinkedIn on Tuesday is so fascinating.

"It’s also clear that the culture and approach that got Uber where it is today is not what will get us to the next level. As we move from an era of growth at all costs to one of responsible growth, our culture needs to evolve," he wrote in a LinkedIn post on Tuesday.

To create new cultural values, some 1,200 employees sent in submission suggestions that were voted on more than 22,000 times, he wrote. Uber followed that up with 20 focus groups.

During the listening tour, Uber asked employees to tell company management what the new norms of corporate culture should be.   From the new CEO's LinkedIn post announcing the new cultural norms at Uber :

Uber’s Cultural Norms

We build globally, we live locally. We harness the power and scale of our global operations to deeply connect with the cities, communities, drivers and riders that we serve, every day.

We are customer obsessed. We work tirelessly to earn our customers’ trust and business by solving their problems, maximizing their earnings or lowering their costs. We surprise and delight them. We make short-term sacrifices for a lifetime of loyalty.

We celebrate differences. We stand apart from the average. We ensure people of diverse backgrounds feel welcome. We encourage different opinions and approaches to be heard, and then we come together and build.

We do the right thing. Period.

We act like owners. We seek out problems and we solve them. We help each other and those who matter to us. We have a bias for action and accountability. We finish what we start and we build Uber to last. And when we make mistakes, we’ll own up to them.

We persevere. We believe in the power of grit. We don’t seek the easy path. We look for the toughest challenges and we push. Our collective resilience is our secret weapon.

We value ideas over hierarchy. We believe that the best ideas can come from anywhere, both inside and outside our company. Our job is to seek out those ideas, to shape and improve them through candid debate, and to take them from concept to action.

We make big bold bets. Sometimes we fail, but failure makes us smarter. We get back up, we make the next bet, and we go!

The note from Uber's new CEO also holds special contempt for something called "toe-stepping." Toe-stepping' was meant to encourage employees to share their ideas regardless of their seniority or position in the company, but too often it was used [as] an excuse for being an a--hole," Khosrowshahi wrote.

What made Uber special was a Viking/Pirate mentality to markets and business obstacles.  That Viking mentality spilled over to the workplace, which is why you see the post-scandal change to the values.

Toe-stepping is required when a city council tries to keep a revolutionary idea out of their city.  It's a problem when it spills over in the workplace via a climate where harassment is OK.

Can Uber remain special as their culture become nicer?  I think it can.  They just are 2-3 years to late with the change.  It will be interesting to watch.  

 


Let's Hangout and Talk - Google Jobs and Recruitment Marketing Spend...

What's up, fellow HR Capitalists?  I had the chance to speak this fall for Jobvite at something called the Recruiter Nation Live Roadshow.  Had a great time and met some great Talent Acquisition leaders, HR pros and Recruiters as a result.  

The energy was so good, we decided to do a hangout series monthly with Jobvite at my other site (Fistful of Talent).  It's going to be an informal 20-30 minute thing, and I'm joined this month by Tim Sackett, topic is how to figure out Google for Jobs, what's up with your recruitment marketing spend as a result, etc.

Stay ahead of the curve and join us - click the link below.  It won't be too formal and if you're interested in coming on and asking a question, let me know that as well.

It all goes down next Tuesday, 11/14 at 1pm EST.  Click below, register and join us!!!

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The Recruiter Nation Live Hangout Series - With Jobvite and Fistful of Talent!

Our first hangout is at 1pm ET on Tuesday, November 14th 

Google for Jobs/ROI of Recruitment Marketing Spend! What You Need to Know to Look Smart!!
 
REGISTER FOR THE HANGOUT BY CLICKING THIS LINK!!!

If you’re a client or follower of Jobvite, you know the Recruiter Nation Live series.  It started with the Recruiter Nation Live Conference in San Francisco last June, and continued with the Recruiter Nation Live Roadshow that brought real recruiter talk to 9 cities in North America over the last three months. 
 
The feedback was great – you loved it, so we’re back with the latest in the series – the Recruiter Nation Live Hangout Series.  Once a month, we’ll be hosting a Google Hangout designed to keep the conversation among recruiters going – focused on things you can use, like the best-kept secrets of today’s smartest and most efficient recruiters, Jedi-mind tricks proven to make you more persuasive/ get great candidate response and strategies to hold your hiring managers accountable for their choices–so everyone wins.
 
Our first hangout is at 1pm ET on Tuesday, November 14th and will be hosted by Kris Dunn and Tim Sackett, focused on the following juicy topic:
 
Google for Jobs/ROI of Recruitment Marketing Spend! What You Need to Know to Look Smart!!
 
REGISTER FOR THE HANGOUT BY CLICKING THIS LINK!!!

Let’s have some fun and learn from each other at the same time.  See you at 1pm ET on November 14th!!!


The Power of Self-Diagnosis In Corporate Coaching...

We've all been there as coaches in corporate America for our team.  

We know the adjustment we need our direct report to make. It's easiest to just tell them what to do with a side dish of "why". Self diagnose

That's prescriptive coaching, and it has its place.  But telling someone what to do is rarely the best path for long term results.  That's why tools I've talked about in the past, like the Please Shut Up 6-Step Coaching Tool, always involve you "shutting up" and forcing the recipient of your coaching to respond/talk/engage.

But there's a senior level to coaching strategy.  I call it Self-Diagnosis and it goes something like this:

1--You've got a long term investment in coaching someone on your team.  You've spent the time, they've heard how you want it done.  If you're really good, they feel like they have participated in that process.

2--Unfortunately, they're still ####ing it up.  They're not as good as you want them to be, especially since you've spent the time.

3--They have good intentions - they are trying, they just haven't put it together - the muscle memory isn't automatic, perhaps it's a reps (not enough practice or live situations) issue.

4--They mess it up. You want to tell them what to do.

5--You resist the urge and go into being a coach that has "self-diagnosis" as part of your package.

6--Next time the performance isn't there, instead of telling them what to do, you ask them to self diagnose what went wrong. Hopefully you've established a pattern of limited feedback points (3-4 things that they need to do given the task or situation).  The first time you ask them to self-diagnose, there will be silence - they're used to to you telling them what to do.

7--But, if you keep asking them to self diagnose, a funny thing happens - they start to develop the ability to evaluate their own performance, which is the true key to performance improvement.

Using self diagnosis is a powerful coaching tool.  You have to lay the groundwork with limited feedback points for the situation/task, as soon as you've done that, you can start using self-diagnosis.

If you haven't used self-diagnosis before, be patient.  It might take 3-4 sessions before the employee understands the expectation is clear - they have to self diagnose, and you're not going to bail them out.

You know you've won when they start self-diagnosing without you asking them to.

Or you could keep telling them what to do and see how that goes for you....

 


Twitter, Trump and Renegade Employees On Their Last Day...

Stop me when you're heard this one before.  

Employee gives notice they're going to leave the company.  Company decides whether it's worth it to allow the employee to work the notice they've just given.  If the risk is high, the employee is offered a hardy handshake and told the notice won't be necessary and walked out the door (whether they are paid depends on the financial status of the company).

You know you've done it before.  The rule of walking people out without letting them work the notice is generally reserved for execs, sales employees and after that - the employees you've always had problems with - I'll call them the canker sores of your company.

Generally, you know which employees to walk out the door.  Occasionally, you let someone stay to work the notice and it totally comes back to bite you on the ass.  That just happened at Twitter - more from The Verge:

President Donald Trump’s Twitter account, @realdonaldtrump, disappeared from the site for around 11 beautiful minutes shortly before 7PM ET. It was not initially clear what happened to the account, and Twitter did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

In a series of tweets issued by Twitter’s Government and Elections team, the company first blamed “human error,” then attributed the move on a rogue employee who used their last day on the job to boot the president off the service. 

Trump's account coming down was originally thought to be a hack.  But here's your tweets with Twitter acknowledging that yes, Jan from customer service, who's moving over to the power company because she's tired of Twitter's shit, deactivated Trump's account on her way out the door.  Kind of like the scene in Jerry McGuire where he leaves the company, takes a fish, makes a scene and ruins and admin's life, except different:

Tweets about trump

Which begs the question, can you prevent employees from doing stupid stuff before they leave?  Probably not.

For any last day renegade action like this, you'll have some employees who cheer it - but just as importantly, you'll have the majority that will think the employee was a complete idiot.

Here's some basic rules for the situation:

1--Trust your gut. If you think the employee is a jerk, don't let them work to the last day. But don't get a reputation for paying out 2 weeks notice, either.

2--Don't allow employees in their last days TO HAVE ACCESS TO SYSTEMS THAT CAN DISABLE FUNCTIONALITY FOR THE POTUS.  Yeah, that seems important - star this one.

3--If somebody does something stupid, find a way to reinforce how stupid it was to the rest of the employee base.  I'm not advocating ruining that employee's reputation, but if they did something stupid, you might as well tell the internal world in a way that doesn't celebrate it, and instead causes people to ponder the recklessness of the moron.

You can't walk everyone who gives you two weeks notice out the door.  But you can trust your gut.  Check your state laws on whether you have to pay a notice out.